Friday, April 18, 2014
Moose antlers at Lori Ann’s cabin along the Mackenzie River, Northwest Territories, Canada.

Moose antlers at Lori Ann’s cabin along the Mackenzie River, Northwest Territories, Canada.

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Mackenzie River ice. Once and a while when you are out on the ice you will hear a sharp explosive crack as a section of ice shifts. No matter how many times I’ve heard it, and irregardless of the fact that I can see the ice extend 6-8 feet below me, it still makes me jump. Tulit’a, Northwest Territories, Canada.

Blowing snow on the Mackenzie on a very warm day. Warm but windy! Tulit’a, Northwest Territories, Canada.

Blowing snow on the Mackenzie on a very warm day. Warm but windy! Tulit’a, Northwest Territories, Canada.

Wednesday, April 16, 2014
This is what Butterball does when he wants me to help him remove little snowballs that build up in the hair between his pads on his paws. Cute little pup! Tulit’a, Northwest Territories, Canada.

This is what Butterball does when he wants me to help him remove little snowballs that build up in the hair between his pads on his paws. Cute little pup! Tulit’a, Northwest Territories, Canada.

Northern lights over Tulit’a as the lunar eclipse took place in the early morning of April 15, 2014. Tulit’a, Northwest Territories, Canada.

Northern lights over Tulit’a as the lunar eclipse took place in the early morning of April 15, 2014. Tulit’a, Northwest Territories, Canada.

Tuesday, April 15, 2014
Last night there was a lunar eclipse over North America. In the Northwest Territories we had not one celestial event but two - northern lights and an eclipse! The two turned out to be difficult to photograph together, so you will just have to trust me that the moon is just beginning to be covered by earth’s shadow in this photograph. It was a really amazing moment to witness. More photos to come soon! Tulit’a, Northwest Territories, Canada.

Last night there was a lunar eclipse over North America. In the Northwest Territories we had not one celestial event but two - northern lights and an eclipse! The two turned out to be difficult to photograph together, so you will just have to trust me that the moon is just beginning to be covered by earth’s shadow in this photograph. It was a really amazing moment to witness. More photos to come soon! Tulit’a, Northwest Territories, Canada.

Sunset over the Mackenzie and Bear Rock, April 14, 2014. Tulit’a, Northwest Territories, Canada.

Sunset over the Mackenzie and Bear Rock, April 14, 2014. Tulit’a, Northwest Territories, Canada.

The Joy of Wild Life

This is a compelling section from the 1927 book by Ernest Thompson Seton titled: Lives of game animals : an account of those land animals in America, north of the Mexican border, which are considered “game,” either because they have held the attention of sportsmen, or received the protection of law. Volume III - Part I. Hoofed Animals.

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Page 134-135

As I gather these chapters, setting forth the Lives of America’s Big Game, the chronicle looms up ever stronger as one long, shameful record, red with blood, and black with crime. For each kind, I find the same bright story at the beginning; and for each and all — or all but one or two — a nauseating finish.

Our people came, they found an earthly Eden-land teeming with big, splendid, wild animals; and proceeded to slaughter them with irresistible weapons, for no purpose other than the brutal joy of seeing them fall. The only reason why they did not use shrapnel, aeroplanes and poison gas in the fell work, was because they did not have them. So the wilds have been desolated; and all our herds of game are so nearly gone that it gives one a thrill of unexpected joy to know that on this list there is a bright exception to the bloody rule. The Northern herds of Caribou, are still found in their millions.

To see with my own eyes this glad wonder, was the lure that took me on that long, silent trip of 2,000 river miles. I saw them — not the millions in migration indeed. But they are surely there; for I saw the scattered summer herds each day, and all day long. And I find the deep and blessed satisfaction that it gave, set forth in my greasy, blotted, Arctic journal of the time, in oft-recurring phrases such as this:

"There never is a day, and rarely an hour of each day, that we do not see several Caribou. Yet I never fail to get a sense of joy at each and every one that comes. ‘There’s a Caribou,’ one says with perennial intensity that is evidence of perennial pleasure in the view. There never is one sighted — and we have seen thousands all told — that does not give me a happy little thrill, the thought ‘This is what I came for. I am thankful that they still live, and that I am here to see them.’"

Monday, April 14, 2014
Riding across Drum Lake with Anthony Doctor. Tets’ehxe (Drum Lake) in the Shúhtagot’ı̨nę Nę́nę́ (Mackenzie Mountains) of the Northwest Territories, Canada.

Riding across Drum Lake with Anthony Doctor. Tets’ehxe (Drum Lake) in the Shúhtagot’ı̨nę Nę́nę́ (Mackenzie Mountains) of the Northwest Territories, Canada.

Fragile ice shards on the Mackenzie River. These pieces of ice have been slowly melting as they are shaped by the sun and wind over the winter. Norman Wells, Northwest Territories, Canada.

Blowing snow on the Mackenzie River near Tulit’a, Northwest Territories, Canada.

Blowing snow on the Mackenzie River near Tulit’a, Northwest Territories, Canada.

Sunday, April 13, 2014

Textures of Norman Wells, Northwest Territories, Canada.