Fine art and and photography reflecting life in the far North.

It’s hard to resist an invitation for a tummy rub like this! Winnipeg, Manitoba.

It’s hard to resist an invitation for a tummy rub like this! Winnipeg, Manitoba.

White wild indigo (Baptisia alba) is a native to North American prairies. Springbrook, Wisconsin.

White wild indigo (Baptisia alba) is a native to North American prairies. Springbrook, Wisconsin.

View from the pilots memorial, August 2011, on my first trip to Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada.

View from the pilots memorial, August 2011, on my first trip to Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada.

Camp on the shores of the Mackenzie River between Tulit’a and Norman Wells, Northwest Territories, Canada.

Camp on the shores of the Mackenzie River between Tulit’a and Norman Wells, Northwest Territories, Canada.

I know this is blurry, but there is something I like about the light and movement. Loons often rise out of the water and flap their wings to shake off water and reset their feathers. Northern Wisconsin.

I know this is blurry, but there is something I like about the light and movement. Loons often rise out of the water and flap their wings to shake off water and reset their feathers. Northern Wisconsin.

Twitter

I’m trying to use twitter a bit more. You can find me at @JeanPolfus for interesting science facts, links to articles, and updates about my research. 

A few years back I canoed with my great aunt Jean, who I am named after, to this beautiful bay on our lake in northern Wisconsin. She wrote this piece about the experience:

“We just barely moved until we were at the edge of the open water and the area where the reed grasses were growing.  These were individual plants separated from each other by an inch or two on all sides.  The sun shone off of each reed and off of the shallow water surrounding each of them.   You could “hear the quiet” of this location.  It was so beautiful, my breath caught in my throat.  The scene was a definition of peacefulness.  We were both reluctant to move because we wanted to savor this special moment and extend it as long as it could be.  When we finally started a snail-pace paddle, I mentioned that I wish I could write a poem to describe this snippet of time and place.  Each one of the reeds were standing so proudly tall, seemingly just for the sole purpose of enthralling the two of us.” - Jean Vincenzi

A few years back I canoed with my great aunt Jean, who I am named after, to this beautiful bay on our lake in northern Wisconsin. She wrote this piece about the experience:

We just barely moved until we were at the edge of the open water and the area where the reed grasses were growing.  These were individual plants separated from each other by an inch or two on all sides.  The sun shone off of each reed and off of the shallow water surrounding each of them.   You could “hear the quiet” of this location.  It was so beautiful, my breath caught in my throat.  The scene was a definition of peacefulness.  We were both reluctant to move because we wanted to savor this special moment and extend it as long as it could be.  When we finally started a snail-pace paddle, I mentioned that I wish I could write a poem to describe this snippet of time and place.  Each one of the reeds were standing so proudly tall, seemingly just for the sole purpose of enthralling the two of us.” - Jean Vincenzi

My Lupine - the sweetest cat ever. Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

Evening canoe in northern Wisconsin.

Evening canoe in northern Wisconsin.

One of the best things about Missoula, Montana is how easy it is to access truly wild places. Pattee Canyon is only a 15 minute drive from the University; and a half hour hike will take you over a ridge and into a valley full of deer, elk, moose, coyotes, mountain lions, wolves, and bears. As M. Sanjayan, leading conservationist, mentioned in his closing remarks at the North American Congress for Conservation Biology conference last week, there is a sense of freedom associated with walking a landscape with large predators. I couldn’t agree more.

One of the best things about Missoula, Montana is how easy it is to access truly wild places. Pattee Canyon is only a 15 minute drive from the University; and a half hour hike will take you over a ridge and into a valley full of deer, elk, moose, coyotes, mountain lions, wolves, and bears. As M. Sanjayan, leading conservationist, mentioned in his closing remarks at the North American Congress for Conservation Biology conference last week, there is a sense of freedom associated with walking a landscape with large predators. I couldn’t agree more.

Common harebell (Campanula rotundifolia) near Missoula, Montana.

Common harebell (Campanula rotundifolia) near Missoula, Montana.

Ponderosa pine. Missoula, Montana.

Ponderosa pine. Missoula, Montana.

Doodling with the sketchbook app on my phone on the plane last night.

Doodling with the sketchbook app on my phone on the plane last night.

The Rattlesnake trails and Rattlesnake Creek near Missoula, Montana.

Well hello cutie pie! Missoula, Montana.

Well hello cutie pie! Missoula, Montana.